on 1 Corinthians 14:1-5

Here is, I think, a great article on this passage of Scripture in the Enrichment Journal.  It is by my NT professor Ben Aker (now professor emeritus) at AGTS.

Here is an excerpt:

Pentecostals hold two fundamental positions regarding the nature of the gift of tongues based upon 1 Corinthians 14:1–5. One group believes that this gift is addressed to God and involves such things as prayer and/or praise. They believe that the one interpreting tongues should speak a praise or petition addressed to God. Tongues in this instance never contain a “message” to believers. Further, tongues are an inferior gift. W.G. MacDonald, a proponent of this position, recently summarized his view: “Glossolalia is always directed to God, and only to Him. In form,glossolalia is spoken or sung to Him. In content, biblical glossolalia consists of worship or prayer. It consists of praise or petition, thanksgiving or intercession. Because glossolalia is unidirectional to God, it cannot be an oracular utterance. Designed for individual edification, glossolalia when properly interpreted, rests at the bottom of the apostolic scale of gifts benefiting the congregation.”1

The other group believes that, like prophecy, the gift of tongues can also be a message directed to the church when accompanied by the interpretation, and that this gift of tongues is no more inferior than any other gift when appropriately manifested.

I wish to present the case for the latter view in an inductive manner by simply allowing the Bible to speak for itself. First, let us examine the larger context of the relevant passage in 1 Corinthians….

Stephen Krstulovich on the ‘God Particle.”

The US Assemblies of God has an article up on their website talking about the so-called “God Particle” “discovery” highlighting the work of Stephen Krstulovich, an engineer at Fermilab in Chicago for more than 25 years and a member of Maranatha Chapel (AG) in Evergreen Park, Illinois:

On July 4, 2012, physicists at the CERN facility in Geneva, Switzerland, announced the discovery of a particle that is likely to be the Higgs boson or “God Particle” as a result of colliding protons using their particle accelerator called the Large Hadron Collider. The news has led to a variety of statements, speculation and new theories.

But what, if anything, does the discovery mean for Christians? Is this a good thing or does this discovery “explain away” God creating the universe?

The answer is surrounded by complexities that perhaps only a particle physicist can fully appreciate, but even Christian physicists are excited about the discovery. But in order to understand what the excitement is all about, it’s important to understand (even simplistically) some science/physics history and what has apparently occurred.

On July 4, 2012, physicists at the CERN facility in Geneva, Switzerland, announced the discovery of a particle that is likely to be the Higgs boson or “God Particle” as a result of colliding protons using their particle accelerator called the Large Hadron Collider. The news has led to a variety of statements, speculation and new theories.

But what, if anything, does the discovery mean for Christians? Is this a good thing or does this discovery “explain away” God creating the universe?

The answer is surrounded by complexities that perhaps only a particle physicist can fully appreciate, but even Christian physicists are excited about the discovery. But in order to understand what the excitement is all about, it’s important to understand (even simplistically) some science/physics history and what has apparently occurred.

Read more here.