Comfort’s Encountering the Manuscripts

The Kindle Edition of Philip Comfort’s Encountering the Manuscripts is $2.99 on Amazon.

Its a good resource for those interested in NT Greek and related studies.  🙂

Here is a description from Amazon:

[Encountering the Manuscripts] focuses on the most significant New Testament manuscripts from the perspective of paleography and textual criticism. Paleography pertains to the dating of the manuscripts, as well as to the calligraphic features of the manuscripts themselves. Each manuscript has a story to tell; each manuscript gives us a window into the transmission of the New Testament text in the earliest centuries. Textual criticism pertains to the critical evaluation of the trustworthiness of the text of each manuscript with respect to recovering the original wording of the Greek New Testament. This volume merges the two areas of study by looking at both paleography and textual criticism as we encounter the New Testament manuscripts.

Blessings,

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require the biblical languages in seminary?

well I think so… so do John Byron and Reed Carlson.

here is a portion from Reed’s blog post on it all where he responds to various objections such as:

OK, but isn’t there an abundance of Bible translations, software, and other tools for that sort of thing?

Yes, and that’s part of the problem. Particularly in English, Bible tools and translations are overwhelming. The Internet has galvanized the proliferation of Bible “experts”—both qualified and unqualified—and it is easier than ever for anyone to access Bible study materials online. Thus, one of the most valuable skills a seminarian can learn in a biblical language course is the ability to recognize and use these materials. How does one distinguish profitable Bible commentary from what is not useful? What are the benefits and limitations of software that does the parsing and dictionary work for you? How do popular Bible translations differ and why does that matter theologically?

Too often biblical language courses succeed only in making students timid when they talk about the Bible. This is in part the fault of instructors who intimidate their students by showcasing the sheer volume of material a first-year seminarian could never hope to learn. Instead, we should be releasing students to make responsible use of the plethora of tools that are available. If they don’t learn these skills when they’re in seminary, when else will they have the chance?

Have a read!  Blessings!

on learning Greek

saw this quote in the interview over at Cliff’s blog that you’ll definitely want to read (about a new project between  Baylor and Mohr Siebeck):

if nothing else, learning Greek will teach you that you can’t bluff your way through everything in life!

-Dr. Naomi Norman

This is just so true!  You cannot bluff your way through NT Greek no matter how hard you try, and you know what many try to do that in life and as usual, in the end, end up with the short end of the stick…

Good food for thought here.  🙂

Book Review: Handy Guide to NT Greek

Handy GuideIt is with thanks to the kind folks at Kregel Academic that I have the chance to do this review of Doug Huffman’s  (Biola) The Handy Guide to New Testament Greek: Grammar, Syntax, and Diagramming (The Handy Guide Series) (Greek Edition) (2013).

As I see it, this little book (112 pages and 7.4 x 5.1 x 0.3 in) is somewhat the NT Greek “equivalent” of Ron Williams’ Hebrew Syntax book.  Both, in my estimation should be on the pastors desk pretty much at all times.

This book is for that pastor or bible teacher, even student who has completed at least one year of Greek and is into their second year and beyond as a support to busy pastors and teachers as a “useful tool and a ready reference” to encourage continued study of NT Greek beyond seminary and or Bible college life.  Its sized to be of similar size to the GNT (either UBS or NA) so that it would basically always be attached to it (more or less).  It is not a grammar and not intended to replace a grammar but to supplement personal study of the GNT and or aide in teaching or preaching preparation.  This is assuming pastors and teachers are working directly from the GNT.  Again, this Handy Guide presumes rudimentary knowledge of NT Greek and is designed for review and further study of grammar, syntax and or diagramming.

The book is laid out in 3 parts: Part 1 covers “Greek Grammar Reminders” (with enough English to be managable). This section basically gives a rundown of what one might see in a standard grammar yet in a very simplified form and basic explanations that go with each of the major categories such as with Nouns, Adjectives, Adverbs, First, Second, Third declensions, etc.  Charts abound throughout as well for all the various paradigms.

Part two summarizes Greek syntax in the form of “usage guides” for the various cases (for example).  As an example, for the Aroist, he lists constative, ingressive, culminative, epistolary, proleptic, dramatic, gnomic.  So in a way it is a super selective and compact version of Wallace’s GGBB.

Part three covers phrase diagramming.  The general purpose of diagramming is to better understand the flow of thought in any given passage under study.  Huffman covers technical, phrase, semantic and arching diagramming.

It really is a useful tool and ready reference and I would say don’t hesitate to pick it up and if I were to teach second year Greek or higher, I would certainly consider this a required text.

Blessings,

Reader’s Greek New Testament – a Photo Review

Through the kindness of friends and family, over the last year I was able to one, replace my copy of Zondervan’s A Reader’s Greek New Testament: 2nd Edition and, two, for Christmas get the UBS Greek New Testament Reader’s Edition With Textual Notes.  In this post I’d like to share them with you via a few photos.  Basically, I am just posting one photo comparing them from the outside, and one each from the inside so you can see the text and the apparatus where the lost of words occuring 30 times or less are listed.  Words occuring more than 30 times are in a lexicon in the back.

I found the differences in the vocab lists in the apparatus interesting. While the UBS edition simply list the most common gloss so as to not slow down the reading; the Zondervan edition gives several meanings for most words.  Also interesting, the UBS edition has the vocabulary words in list format, whereas the Zondervan edition lists them in a more prose format.  The paper for the UBS edition is thicker and sturdier, while the Zondervan edition is thinner not unlike the paper in a typical Bible.  This probably explains the thickness differences.   The UBS edition has two ribbons, the Zondervan edition only one ribbon.

In my personal opinion, the UBS edition is easier on the eyes to look at.  It is the standard UBS text with the definitions listed in lieu of the textual apparatus.  The Zondervan edition is based on that text which underlies the NIV Translation and the text is based on a different script than the UBS.  The definitions are italicized.  It can seem a bit “busier” if you will.

Well, I hope this helps some.  Blessings!

Here are a few photos:

This one compares the sizes:

sizes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is the UBS edition:

photo 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is the Zondervan edition:

photo 2

Reading the through Greek New Testament

For those interested and or brave or disciplined enough to give it a shot – Dan Wallace has a blog post offering a graded approach to reading through the Greek New Testament.

You can check it out here: Reading through the Greek New Testament

He recommends a good resource to help the process along too: A New Reader’s Lexicon of the Greek New Testament

Blessings,